Updated Wales indicators

  • Location of low income:
    • first graph (working-age adults over time): the proportion of working-age people in receipt of out-of-work benefits has followed similar trends over time in all types of authority.
    • second graph and first map (working-age adults by local authority): twice as many working-age people in Blaenau Gwent and Merthyr Tydfil are in receipt of out-of-work benefits as in Ceredigion, Monmouthshire and Powys.
    • third graph (retirement-age adults over time): the proportion of older people in receipt of the guaranteed element of Pension Credit has followed similar trends over time in all types of authority.
    • fourth graph and second map (retirement-age adults by local authority): more people are in receipt of guaranteed Pension Credit in The Valleys than elsewhere but the differences are much less than for working-age people in receipt of out-of-work benefits.
  • Out-of-work benefit recipients:
    • first graph (over time): despite a rise in the the latest two years, the number of benefit claimants is still below that of a decade ago. The biggest group of benefit claimants remains those who are sick or disabled.
    • second graph (by reason): two-fifths of all claimants of out-of-work disability benefits have mental or behaviour conditions.
    • third graph (by age): two-fifths of all working-age claimants of out-of-work disability benefits are less than 45.
    • fourth graph and map (by local authority): twice as many working-age people in Blaenau Gwent and Merthyr Tydfil are in receipt of out-of-work benefits as in Ceredigion, Monmouthshire and Powys.
    • fifth graph (compared with Great Britain): Wales has more people in receipt of out-of-work benefits than most of the rest of Great Britain. This is mainly because it has a high number of people who are both sick or disabled and out-of-work.
  • Long-term working-age recipients of out-of-work benefits:
    • first graph (over time): most working-age people receiving a key out-of-work benefit for two years or more are sick or disabled.
    • second graph (by reason): two-fifths of all long-term claimants of out-of-work disability benefits have mental or behaviour disorders.
    • third graph (by age): two-thirds of the long-term claimants of out-of-work disability benefits are aged less than 55 and a third are aged less than 45.
  • Concentrations of poor children:
    • first graph (over time): almost half of all the primary school children who are eligible for free school meals are concentrated in a fifth of the schools, a similar proportion to a decade ago.
    • second graph (by type of school): poor children are much more concentrated in primary schools than in secondary schools.
    • second graph (by local authority): in some authorities, a third or more of the primary schools have a high proportion of their pupils eligible for free school meals. In other authorities, there are very few such primary schools.
  • Educational attainment at age 11:
    • second graph and map (by local authority): the proportion of 11-year-olds assessed as failing to achieve level 4 or above at Key Stage 2 is highest in Blaenau Gwent and Merthyr Tydfil.
  • Concentrations of worklessness:
    • first graph (over time): over the last decade, claimant numbers in the areas with the most claimants have fallen at a somewhat slower rate than those in the areas with the least claimants.
    • second graph (rates): around a third of working-age people receive out-of-work benefits in the areas with the highest concentrations. This is twice the rate for areas with average concentrations.
    • third graph (shares): around a third of working-age recipients of out-of-work benefits live in a fifth of small areas, whilst the other two-thirds live outside of these areas.
  • Location of low pay:
    • first graph and map (by local authority): the proportion of employees earning less than £7 per hour is highest in Gwynedd.
    • second graph (compared with the United Kingdom): Wales has a somewhat higher proportion of employees earning less than £7 per hour than most other parts of the United Kingdom.
  • Pay inequalities:
    • first graph (over time): at both the top and the bottom of the pay scale, rates of pay for women have become closer to rates of pay for men but are still lower.
    • second graph (by gender and type): almost half of all part-time workers – both men and women – are paid less than £7 per hour.
  • Longstanding illness/disability:
    • first graph (by age and social class): at all ages, adults in routine and manual occupational groups are somewhat more likely to have a limiting longstanding illness than those from other occupational groups.
  • Excess winter deaths:
    • first graph (over time): each year around 1,500 more people aged 65 or over die in winter months than in other months.
    • second graph (compared to England): the rate of excess winter deaths amongst those aged 65 and over in Wales is similar to that in all of the English regions.