Updated Wales indicators

  • Lacking consumer durables:
    • first graph (over time): the proportion of low income households lacking selected consumer durables has fallen considerably since the early 1990s.
  • School exclusions:
    • second graph (compared to Great Britain): the rate of permanent exclusion is much lower in Wales than in most of the English regions but higher than in Scotland.
  • Blue collar jobs:
    • first graph (over time by industry): while the total number of jobs is higher than a decade ago, the number of jobs in manufacturing, construction and other production industries has fallen.
    • second graph (over time within production): whilst manufacturing has been declining, the number of jobs in construction is similar to a decade ago.
    • third graph (by region): the pattern of an increase in total jobs, combined with a decrease in the number of jobs in the production industries, has occurred throughout the United Kingdom as well as in Wales.
  • Mental health:
    • first graph (by gender and work status): people who are working are at much lower risk of mental illness than those who are either unemployed or long-term sick or disabled.
  • Homelessness:
    • first graph (over time): the number of newly homeless households has halved since 2004 but is still around 8,000 households a year.
    • second graph (by family type): three-quarters of those officially recognised as homeless do not have dependent children and most of the others are lone parents. Very few are couples with children.
    • third graph (by reason): the biggest reason for becoming homeless is loss of accommodation provided by relatives or friends.
    • fourth graph and map (by local authority): every local authority has a homelessness problem, but the greatest problems appear to be in Swansea.
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    • fifth graph (in temporary accommodation): although now falling, the number of homeless households in temporary accommodation is still three times that of a decade ago.
  • Burglaries:
    • first graph (compared to England): the burglary rate is lower in Wales than in any of the English regions.
    • second graph (by local authority): burglary appears to be much more common in Newport, Cardiff and Swansea than elsewhere.