Updated UK indicators

  • Lacking essentials:
    • first graph (by item/activity – adults): many people on low incomes say that they cannot afford selected essential items or activities – but so do quite a lot of people on average incomes.
    • second graph (by item/activity – children): regular holidays are by far the most common ‘essential’ item that children in low-income households lack because their parents say that they cannot afford them.
  • In arrears with bills:
    • first graph (by income): a fifth of families in the poorest fifth are in arrears with their bills. This is three times the rate for those on average incomes.
    • second graph (by family work status): a fifth of workless working-age families are in arrears with their bills. This is five times the rate for all-working families.
  • Benefit levels:
    • third graph (compared to low-income thresholds): means-tested benefits for a working-age couple with no children are only around half the low-income threshold. By contrast, for a pensioner couple, means-tested benefits are similar to the low-income threshold.
  • Concentrations of poor children:
    • first graph (over time): half of all the primary and nursery school children who are eligible for free school meals are concentrated in a fifth of the schools, a similar proportion to a decade ago.
    • second graph (by phase of education): pupils eligible for free school meals have, on average, twice as many pupils in their school eligible for free school meals.
    • third graph (by region): two-thirds of all local education primary and nursery schools in inner London have a high proportion of their children eligible for free school meals.
  • Low birthweight babies:
    • third graph (by region): the proportion of babies who are of low birthweight is similar in all regions of Great Britain.
  • Educational attainment at age 16:
    • third graph (by free school meal eligibility and gender): young adults are much more likely to live in low-income households than older working-age adults.
    • fourth graph (by free school meal eligibility and ethnicity): unemployed young adults are less likely to be in a low-income household than their older counterparts.
  • Older people with no private income:
    • first graph (over time): 1.2 million pensioners have no income other than the state retirement pension and state benefits. This is a similar number as a decade ago.
    • second graph (not contributing – by income): the proportion of workers without a current pension increases as household income decreases. Two-thirds of those in the poorest fifth do not have a current pension.
    • third graph (not contributing – by age): for all ages from 40 to 60, around a third of workers do not have a current pension.
  • Without a bank account:
    • first graph (by income – over time): the proportion of low-income households with no bank account is much lower than a decade ago.
    • second graph (by income – by type of account): whilst only 5-6% of the poorest fifth of households now have no account, this rises to 11% if Post Office Card Accounts are not considered to be accounts.
  • Mortgage repossessions:
    • third graph (by income): 500,000 homeowners in the poorest fifth expend more than a quarter of their after tax income on mortgage interest repayments. This represents half of all mortgage holders in the poorest fifth.
  • Housing benefit:
    • second graph (by group): one in five households in rented accommodation have a low income but still have to pay full rent.