Updated UK indicators

  • Lacking consumer durables:
    • first graph (over time): one in six households in low income lack either a freezer or a washing machine. This compares with one in three a decade ago.
    • second graph (by item): for all consumer durables, the proportion of low-income households who are lacking them is much lower than a decade ago but still higher than for those on average incomes.
  • Benefit levels:
    • first graph (over time re inflation): while the level of means-tested benefits for both families with children and pensioners has gone up much faster than inflation over the last decade, that for working-age adults without children has remained constant in real terms.
    • second graph (over time re earnings): until the recent small rises, the level of means-tested benefits, relative to earnings, for working-age adults without children had been in continual decline, unlike those for both pensioners and families with children.
  • Children in workless households:
    • fifth graph (compared to the European Union): the UK has a higher proportion of its children living in workless households than any other EU country.
  • Low birthweight babies:
    • second graph (by family type): babies born to lone parents are more likely to be of low birthweight than babies born to couples.
  • Underage pregnancies:
    • third graph (by social class): teenage motherhood is eight times as common amongst those from manual social backgrounds as for those from professional backgrounds.
  • School exclusions:
    • first and second graphs (over time): the number of permanent exclusions has fallen by a third over the last six years.
    • third graph (by ethnic group): Black Caribbean pupils are three times as likely to be permanently excluded from school as pupils from any other ethnic group.
    • fourth graph (by region): the rate of permanent exclusion is much lower in Scotland than elsewhere in Great Britain.
  • Not in education, employment or training:
    • third graph (by destination): the proportion of 16- to 18-year-olds who are in full-time education has increased in recent years.
    • fourth graph (by gender): among 16- to 18-year-olds, more girls than boys continue in full-time education.
    • fifth graph (by ethnic group): the proportion of White 16-year-olds who do not continue in full time education is much higher than that for any ethnic minority, but many are undertaking some form of training.
  • Young adults with a criminal record:
    • second graph (by ethnic group): black young adults are four times as likely as white young adults to be in prison.
  • Blue collar jobs:
    • first graph (over time by industry): while the total number of jobs is higher than a decade ago, the number of jobs in manufacturing, construction and other production industries has fallen.
    • second graph (over time within production): whilst manufacturing has been declining, the number of jobs in construction is similar to a decade ago.
    • third graph (by region): over the last decade, all parts of the UK have seen a rise in service jobs combined with a loss of jobs in manufacturing, construction and other production industries.
  • Workless households:
    • third graph (compared to the European Union): the UK has a higher proportion of its working-age population living in workless households than most other EU countries.
  • Housing benefit:
    • first graph (over time): around two-fifths of pensioner households entitled to Council Tax Benefit – and a third of those entitled to Pension Credit – are not claiming them. These are much higher proportions than a decade ago.
    • second graph (by amount): of the estimated £4½ billion of unclaimed income-related benefits to which pensioners were entitled in 2008/09, Pensioner Credit accounted for half while Council Tax Benefit accounted for a third.
    • third graph (by tenure): half of the owner occupiers entitled to Pension Credit are not claiming it, a much higher proportion than for those in other tenures.
    • fourth graph (by family type): the proportion of pensioner households entitled to, but not claiming, Pension Credit is somewhat higher for pensioner couples than for single pensioners.
  • Access to transport:
    • first graph (journeys): people in households without a car make fewer than half the number of journeys as those with a car.
    • third graph (cars by household income): just about all households with above-average incomes have a car but half of low-income households do not.
    • fifth graph (cars by gender): although the proportion is coming down, two-fifths of women still do not drive. This compares with a quarter of men.
  • Homelessness:
    • fifth graph (in temporary accommodation – over time): the number of homeless households placed in temporary accommodation has fallen sharply since 2005.
    • fifth graph (in temporary accommodation – by region): the number of households in temporary accommodation is an order of magnitude greater in London than elsewhere.
  • Housing benefit:
    • first graph (over time): levels of non-take-up of Housing Benefit are much higher than a decade ago. This is the case for both pensioners and those of working-age.
  • Victims of crime:
    • first graph (over time): both burglaries and violent crimes have fallen by almost half over the last decade.
    • second graph (by household type): young households and the unemployed are at high risk of both being burgled and of being the victims of violence.
    • third graph (by region): the burglary rate is almost twice as high in Yorkshire & the Humber and in London as in Wales. There is less variation in the incidence of violent crime.
    • fourth graph (levels of worry): the proportion of adults who are very worried about being the victim of crime is much lower than a decade ago.
    • sixth graph (beliefs): throughout the last decade, many more adults think that their local crime rate has been increasing than think that it has been decreasing.