Updated UK indicators

  • CHildren in workless households:
    • fifth graph (compared to the European Union): the UK has a higher proportion of its children living in workless households than any other EU country except Ireland.
  • Children with a criminal record:
    • first graph (over time): the number of children cautioned for indictable offences has fallen sharply since 2007 and is now at the lowest for many years.
    • second graph (by age – rates): the peak rate for for offending is at ages 17 to 20.
    • third graph (by age – shares): almost half of the offences committed by children are committed by those aged 15 or under.
    • fourth graph (by gender): four times as many boys are found guilty of, or cautioned for, indictable offences as girls but the difference is much less for theft and much greater for drug offences.
  • Looked-after children:
    • first graph (over time): there are 65,000 looked-after children in England, slightly more than a decade ago.
    • third graph (status at age 19): a third of previously looked-after children are not in education, employment or training at age 19.
  • Young adults with a criminal record:
    • first graph (over time): the number of 18- to 20-year-olds found guilty of an indictable offence fell between 1999 and 2004 but has remained broadly unchanged since then.
  • Concentrations of worklessness:
    • first graph (over time): overall, claimant numbers have followed similar trends in both the areas with the most claimants and the areas with the least claimants.
    • second graph (rates): 30% of working-age people receive out-of-work benefits in the areas with the highest concentrations. This compares with 12% in areas with average concentrations.
    • third graph (shares): 40% of working-age recipients of out-of-work benefits live in a fifth of small areas, whilst the other 60% live outside of these areas.
  • Workless households:
    • third graph (compared to the European Union): the UK has a higher proportion of its working-age population living in workless households than most other EU countries.
  • Premature death:
    • third graph (by social class): men aged 25-64 from routine or manual backgrounds are twice as likely to die as those from managerial or professional backgrounds. There are also similar proportion differences for women aged 25-59.
    • fourth graph (by cause – men only): the two biggest causes of death among men aged 25 to 64 are cancers and circulatory diseases (including heart disease).
  • Excess winter deaths:
    • first graph (over time): each year around 20,000 more people aged 65 or over die in winter months than in other months.
    • second graph (by region): the rate of excess winter deaths amongst those aged 65 and over is similar in all regions.