Updated UK indicators

  • Children in workless households:
    • first and second graphs (over time): around 1.9 million children live in workless households. Two-thirds of them are in lone parent households.
    • third graph (by household type): half of all children of lone parents live in households which are workless. This compares to just one in fifteen for children of couples.
    • fourth graph (by region): at almost a third of all children, the proportion of children who are in workless households in inner London is much higher than elsewhere.
  • Low birthweight babies:
    • first graph (over time): babies born to parents from manual social backgrounds continue to be more somewhat likely to have a low birthweight than those born to parents from non-manual social backgrounds.
    • fourth graph (link with infant deaths – rates): there is a very strong relationship between low birthweight and the subsequent likelihood of infant death.
    • fifth graph (link with infant deaths – shares): two-thirds of all infant deaths are among those borne of low birthweight.
  • Infant deaths:
    • first graph (over time): although down by a fifth on a decade ago, infant deaths are still 50% more common among those from manual backgrounds than among those from non-manual backgrounds.
  • Looked-after children:
    • first graph (educational attainment): although falling, a third of looked-after children still obtain no GCSEs and a further fifth obtain fewer than five GCSEs .
  • Young adults without a basic qualification:
    • first graph (over time): The proportion of 19-year-olds without a basic level of qualification has fallen sharply in recent years, down from a third in 2004 to a fifth in 2009.
  • Young adult low pay:
    • fourth graph (rates by industry): in wholesale, retail, hotels and restaurants, around three-quarters of all employees aged 16 to 24 are paid less than £7 per hour.
    • fifth graph (shares by industry): half of all adults aged 16 to 24 earning less than £7 per hour work in wholesale, retail, hotels or restaurants.
  • Work and lone parents:
    • first graph (over time): 57% of lone parents are working, up from 48% a decade ago.
    • second graph (by region): the proportion of lone parents who lack, but want, paid work is much higher in London than elsewhere.
  • Work and ethnicity:
    • first graph (over time): one in seven adults aged 25 to retirement from ethnic minorities are not working but want to, lower than a decade ago but still much higher than that for White people.
    • second graph (by group): around a third of Bangladeshis and Pakistanis are both not in paid work and say that they do not want paid work, a much higher proportion than that for any other ethnic group.
    • fourth graph (workless households): a quarter of working-age Bangladeshi, Black Caribbean and Black African households are workless.
  • Workless households:
    • first graph (over time): single adult households – both with and without children – are much more likely to be workless than couple households.
    • second graph (shares): half of workless, working-age households are single adults without dependent children.
  • Low pay and disability:
    • first graph (by gender and full-/part-time): for both full-time and part-time work, the proportion of employees with a work-limiting disability who are low paid is higher than that for employees without a work-limiting disability.
    • second graph (by qualifications): at all levels of qualification, the proportion of people with a work-limiting disability who are low paid is somewhat greater than for those without a disability.
  • Help from social services:
    • second graph (by region): somewhat fewer older people are helped to live at home in the South (outside London) than elsewhere in England.
    • third graph (by type of authority): on average, English county councils support somewhat fewer older people to live independently at home than urban authorities.
  • Without a telephone:
    • first graph (over time): just about all pensioners now have a telephone.
  • Without home contents insurance:
    • first graph (by income): half of the poorest households do not have home contents insurance, the same as a decade ago and more than twice the rate for households with average incomes.
  • Polarisation by housing tenure:
    • second graph (over time – work): in two-thirds of households in social housing, the head of household is not in paid work. Although this has been the case throughout the last decade, it was only a half at the start of the 1980s.
    • third graph (by age group): half of heads of households aged between 25 and 54 in social rented housing are not in paid work compared to just one in fifteen of those in owner-occupation.
    • fourth graph (by region): three-quarters of heads of households in social housing in Northern Ireland are not in work, more than in any other part of the UK.