Updated UK indicators

  • State benefit levels:
    • second graph (over time – re earnings): while the level of means-tested benefits for working-age adults without children is, relative to earnings, lower than a decade ago, that for both pensioners and families with children is higher.
  • School exclusions:
    • first and second graphs (over time): the number of permanent exclusions has fallen by two-fifths over the last six years.
    • third graph (by ethnic group): despite reductions in recent years, Black Caribbean pupils are still four times as likely to be permanently excluded from school as pupils from any other ethnic group.
    • fourth graph (by region): the rate of permanent exclusion is much lower in Scotland than elsewhere in Great Britain.
  • Not in education, employment or training:
    • third graph (by destination): the proportion of 16- to 18-year-olds who are in full-time education has increased in recent years.
    • fourth graph (by gender): among 16- to 18-year-olds, more girls than boys continue in full-time education.
  • With a criminal record:
    • first graph (by ethnic group): Black young adults are four times as likely as White young adults to be in prison.
  • Young adult drug use:
    • first graph (over time): at 7%, the proportion of young adults using class A drugs is somewhat lower than a decade ago.
  • Blue collar jobs:
    • first graph (over time – by industry): while the total number of jobs is higher than a decade ago, the number of jobs in manufacturing, construction and other production industries has fallen.
    • second graph (over time – within production): within production, it is manufacturing which has been declining, with the number of jobs in construction to a decade ago.
    • third graph (by region): the pattern of an increase in total jobs, combined with a decrease in the number of jobs in the production industries, has occurred throughout most of the United Kingdom.
  • Insecure at work:
    • first graph (job insecurity – proportions): half of the men, and a third of the women, making a new claim for Jobseeker’s Allowance were last claiming less than six months previously.
    • second graph (job insecurity – numbers): the number of people making a new claim for Jobseeker’s Allowance who were last claiming less than six months previously has risen substantially since 2008.
  • Access to transport:
    • first graph (journeys): people in households without a car make half the number of journeys as those with a car.
    • third graph (cars by household income): just about all households with above-average incomes have a car but half of low-income households do not.
    • fifth graph (cars by gender): although the proportion is coming down, two-fifths of women still do not drive. This compares with a quarter of men.
  • Non-decent homes:
    • first graph (over time): 30% of homes in England are classified as non-decent, substantially less than in the mid-1990s.
    • second graph (by tenure): two-thirds of non-decent homes are owner-occupied.
    • third graph (by income): poor households are no more likely to live in a non-decent home than richer households.
    • fourth graph (by region): the proportion of homes in England which are non-decent varies from around 40% in the South West to less than 25% in the North East.
    • fifth graph (by type of area): the proportion of homes which are non-decent is much higher in the more rural areas.
  • Energy inefficient homes:
    • first graph (over time): the proportion of dwellings in England which are very energy inefficient has been declining for all types of tenure, but most sharply in the social rented sector.
    • second graph (by tenure): two-thirds of homes which are very energy inefficient are owner-occupied and a further quarter are private rented.
    • third graph (by income): for any given tenure, the proportion of homes which are very energy inefficient does not vary much by level of income.
    • fourth graph (by region): the proportion of homes which are very energy inefficient is higher in the South West than elsewhere in England.
    • fifth graph (by type of area): the proportion of dwellings which are very energy inefficient is much higher in the most rural areas.
  • Fuel poverty:
    • first graph (over time): 4 million households in England were classified as being in fuel poverty in 2009, much higher than a few years ago but still lower than in the mid-1990s.
    • second graph (by tenure): fuel poverty is most common among those live in private rented accommodation.
    • third graph (by income): although the risk of fuel poverty rises sharply as income falls, there are many households in the poorest fifth who are not in fuel poverty and many households not in the poorest fifth who are in fuel poverty.
    • fourth graph (by energy efficiency): the risk of fuel poverty rises as the energy efficiency of homes falls, so the risk is greatest when low income is combined with energy inefficiency.
    • fifth graph (by household type): single-person households are much more likely to be in fuel poverty than other household types, both overall and among those in low income.
    • sixth graph (by type of area): Rural households are much more likely to be in fuel poverty than urban households, both overall and among those in low income.
    • seventh graph (by region): within England, fuel poverty is most prevalent in the West Midlands and North East.
  • Unmet housing need:
    • first graph (over time): the number of new social housing dwellings in 2010/11 exceeded that required to keep up with demographic change, but this is only the third time that this has happened in the last 14 years.
  • Victims of crime:
    • first graph (over time): the number of both burglaries and violent crimes is substantially lower than a decade ago.
    • third graph (by region): the burglary rate is twice as high in Yorkshire & the Humber and in London as in Wales. There is less variation in the incidence of violent crime.
    • fourth graph (worries – over time): the proportion of adults who are very worried about being the victim of crime is much lower than a decade ago.
    • sixth graph (beliefs – over time): throughout the last decade, many more adults thought that their local crime rate had been increasing than thought that it had been decreasing.