Updated UK indicators

  • Accidental deaths among children:
    • first graph (over time): accidental deaths amongst the under-16s have almost halved over the last decade.
  • Without a basic qualification at age 19:
    • second graph (by age group): although a half of young adults do not obtain a level 2 qualification at age 16, this proportion reduces to a quarter by age 21.
    • third graph (by gender): fewer girls lack a basic level of qualification than boys.
  • Impact of qualifications on work:
    • first graph (lack of work): the lower a young adult’s qualifications, the more likely they are to be lacking but wanting paid work. Even so, ‘only’ a quarter of those aged 25 to 29 with low or no qualifications lack but want work.
    • second graph (low pay): the lower a young adult’s qualifications, the more likely they are to be low paid. Half of all employees aged 25 to 29 with low or no qualifications are low paid.
  • Not in education, employment or training:
    • first graph (over time): one in eight 16- to 19-year-olds is not in education, employment or training, somewhat higher than a decade ago.
    • second graph (by region): The proportion of 16- to 19-year-olds who are not in education, employment or training is somewhat lower in Northern Ireland than elsewhere.
    • third graph (by region): the proportion of 16- to 18-year-olds who are in full-time education has increased in recent years.
    • fourth graph (by gender): among 16- to 18-year-olds, more girls than boys continue in full-time education.
  • Work and gender:
    • first graph (not working – over time): the proportion of working-age women who are not working is much lower than forty years ago whilst the equivalent proportion for men is much higher.
    • second graph (economically inactive): these trends – of increasing work rates for women and decreasing work rates for men – have been happening throughout the last forty years.
    • third graph (not working – by age group): differences in work rates between men and women are much greater among those aged 25 to 49 than in either younger or older age groups.
  • Blue collar jobs:
    • third graph (by gender): one in three full-time male workers are in production industries, compared to around one in ten full-time female workers and part-time workers.
    • fourth graph (by industry): manufacturing, construction and other production industries are the areas which are dominated by full-time male workers.
  • Low pay by industry:
    • first graph (risks): two-third of employees in hotels & restaurants – and half of those in retail & wholesale – earn less than £7 per hour. Three-fifths of them are women.
    • second graph (shares): a quarter of workers earning less than £7 per hour work in the public sector.
    • third graph (by age group): much of the low pay in the hotels & restaurants and retail & wholesale sectors is in the younger age groups. By contrast, low pay in the public sector is spread throughout the age range.
  • Insecure at work:
    • third graph (temporary/part-time): most part-time employees do not want a full-time job – but only a quarter of temporary employees do not want a permanent job.
    • fourth graph (temporary contracts): the number of people in temporary contracts is somewhat lower than a decade ago.
    • fifth graph (union membership): only one in nine workers earning less than £7 an hour belong to a trade union, a much smaller proportion than for those with higher hourly earnings.
  • Access to training:
    • first graph (over time): throughout the last decade, people with no qualifications have been around three times less likely to receive job-related training than those with some qualifications.
    • second graph (by level of qualification): the lower a person’s level of educational qualifications, the less likely they are to receive job-related training.
    • third graph (by occupation): access to training differs significantly by occupation, being least in elementary (routine) occupations, plant & machine operatives and skilled trades.
    • fourth graph (by industry): the best access to training is in the public sector.
  • Working-age adults without qualifications:
    • first graph (over time): the proportion of the working-age population without any educational qualifications has fallen by a third over the last decade.
    • second graph (by age and gender): the proportion of people in their twenties without any educational qualifications is much smaller than the proportion for people aged 40 and over but similar to the proportion for people in their thirties.
    • third graph (by region): the proportion of the working-age population without any educational qualifications is much higher in Northern Ireland than in the rest of the UK.
  • Mental health:
    • first and second graphs (over time): the proportion of working-age people who are deemed to be at a high risk of developing a mental illness is somewhat lower than a decade ago. Women are more at risk than men.
    • third graph (by income): adults in the poorest fifth are much more likely to be at risk of developing a mental illness than those on average incomes.
    • fourth graph (by social class): people from manual backgrounds are at slightly higher risk of developing a mental illness than those from non-manual backgrounds.
    • fifth graph (by region): the risk of mental illness is similar across all the regions in England.
  • Obesity:
    • first and second graphs (over time): almost a quarter of working-age people are now obese. This is a much higher proportion than a decade ago.
    • third graph (by income): there no obvious relationship between obesity and income. The groups with the lowest levels of obesity are poor men and rich women.
    • fourth graph (by social class): there is no obvious relationship between obesity and social class.
    • fifth graph (by region): in England, the proportion of working-age people who are obese is lowest in London.
  • Homelessness:
    • first graph (over time): the number of newly homeless households has fallen by two-thirds since 2004.
    • second graph (by region): although most prevalent in London and the West Midlands, homelessness is to be found throughout the country.
    • third graph (by reason): by far the biggest reason for becoming homeless is loss of accommodation provided by relatives or friends.
    • fourth graph (by ethnic group): a quarter of those accepted as homeless and in priority need by English local authorities are from ethnic minorities.
    • seventh graph (in temporary accommodation by length of stay): 30% of households leaving temporary accommodation in 2009 had stayed there for a year or more.
  • Mortgage repossessions:
    • first graph (over time): mortgage re-possessions have been rising sharply since 2004 and, by 2009, were seven times the level of 2004. They are now back to the levels of 1993.