Updated UK indicators

  • Numbers in low income:
    • fourth graph (compared to Europe): the UK has a slightly higher proportion of its population in relative low income than the European Union average.
  • Out-of-work benefit recipients:
    • first graph (over time): the rise in the number of unemployed claimants in the latest two years has more than offset all the reductions in the previous decade. Despite this rise, the biggest group of benefit claimants remains those who are sick or disabled.
    • second graph (by reason): two-fifths of all claimants of out-of-work disability benefits have mental or behaviour disorders.
    • third graph (by age): two-fifths of all working-age claimants of out-of-work disability benefits are aged less than 45.
    • fourth graph and map (by region): almost twice as many working-age people in the North East and Wales are claimants of out-of-work benefits as in the South East.
  • Long-term working-age recipients of out-of-work benefits:
    • first graph (over time): most working-age people receiving a key out-of-work benefit for two years or more are sick or disabled.
    • second graph (by reason): two-fifths of all long-term claimants of out-of-work disability benefits have mental or behaviour disorders.
    • third graph (by age): two-thirds of the long-term claimants of out-of-work disability benefits are aged less than 55 and a third are aged less than 45.
  • Children with a criminal record:
    • first graph (over time): the number of children cautioned for indictable offences has fallen sharply since 2007, reversing the previously rising trend.
    • second graph (by age – rates): the peak rate for for offending is at age 17.
    • third graph (by age – shares): half of the offences committed by children are committed by those aged 15 or under.
    • fourth graph (by gender): three times as many boys are found guilty of, or cautioned for, indictable offences as girls but the difference is much less for theft and much greater for drug offences.
  • Young adult low pay:
    • first graph (over time): there are 65,000 looked-after children in England, slightly more than a decade ago.
    • third graph (status at age 19): a third of previously looked-after children are not in education, employment or training at age 19.
  • Young adults with a criminal record:
    • first graph (over time): the number of 18- to 20-year-olds found guilty of an indictable offence fell between 1999 and 2004 but has remained broadly unchanged since then.
  • Young adult low pay:
    • first and second graphs (over time): in 2010, two-thirds of all employees aged 18 to 21 – both men and women – were paid less than £7 per hour.
    • third graph (by gender): for those aged 18 to 21, the distribution of pay rates are similar for both men and women.
    • fourth graph (by age): between the ages of 18 and 21, half of all full-time employees are paid less than £7 per hour. This is in sharp contrast to the much lower proportions for those aged 22 and over.
  • Young adult suicides:
    • first graph (over time): the number of suicides amongst young adults aged 15 to 24 has fallen by a third over the last decade, although that decline has now ceased.
    • second graph (by gender): four-fifths of young adult suicides are males.
    • third graph (young adult deaths more generally): as well as suicides, young men are also much more likely to die from accidents than are young women.
  • Concentrations of worklessness:
    • first graph (over time): overall, claimant numbers have followed similar trends in both the areas with the most claimants and the areas with the least claimants.
    • second graph (rates): 30% of working-age people receive out-of-work benefits in the areas with the highest concentrations. This compares with 12% in areas with average concentrations.
    • third graph (shares): 40% of working-age recipients of out-of-work benefits live in a fifth of small areas, whilst the other 60% live outside of these areas.
  • Numbers in low pay:
    • first and second graphs (over time): the proportion of employees aged 22 and over who were low paid fell between 2002 and 2005 but has not changed much since then. In 2010, a fifth of the women – and a tenth of the men – were paid less than £7 per hour.
    • third graph (by gender): whatever low-pay threshold is used, the proportion of working women who are low paid is around twice that of working men.
    • fourth graph (by age): at all ages, 30% or more of part-time employees are paid less than £7 per hour. Except for the 18-21 age group, the proportion of full-time employees paid less than £7 per hour is much lower.
    • fifth graph (by occupation): in two areas of occupation – elementary and sales & customer service – two-thirds of part-time employees are paid less than £7 per hour.
    • sixth graph (shares by gender): more than half of those paid less than £7 per hour are part-time workers, mainly women.
    • seventh graph (shares by age): almost half of those paid less than £7 per hour are aged 40 or over.
  • Low income and disability:
    • fourth graph (compared to Europe): the proportion of economically inactive working-age adults who are in relative low income is higher in the UK than in any other EU country.
  • Location of low pay:
    • first graph and map (by region): in most regions, at least a fifth of all female employees earn less than £7 per hour.
  • Pay inequalities:
    • first graph (over time): low-paid women are paid around 10% less than low-paid men. High-paid women are paid around 20% less than high-paid men.
    • second graph (by gender and type): a half of all part-time workers – both men and women – are paid less than £8 per hour.
    • third graph (by region): pay inequalities are greater in London, the South East and East than elsewhere.
  • Excess winter deaths:
    • first graph (over time): each year around 20,000 more people aged 65 or over die in winter months than in other months.
    • second graph (by region): the rate of excess winter deaths amongst those aged 65 and over is similar in all regions.