Updated Scotland indicators

  • Location of low income:
    • first graph and first map (working-age adults by local authority): the proportion of working-age people in receipt of out-of-work benefits is more than twice as high in Glasgow, Inverclyde, West Dunbartonshire and North Ayrshire than in some other parts of Scotland.
    • second graph and first map (retirement-age adults by local authority): more than twice as many people are in receipt of guaranteed Pension Credit in Glasgow than in most of the rest of Scotland.
  • Out-of-work benefit recipients:
    • first graph (over time): despite a rise in the the latest two years, the number of benefit claimants is still well below that of a decade ago. The biggest group of benefit claimants remains those who are sick or disabled.
    • second graph (by reason): almost half of all claimants of out-of-work disability benefits have mental or behaviour disorders.
    • third graph (by age): two-fifths of all working-age claimants of out-of-work disability benefits are aged less than 45.
    • fourth graph and map (by local authority): the proportion of working-age people in receipt of out-of-work benefits is more than twice as high in Glasgow, Inverclyde, West Dunbartonshire and North Ayrshire than in some other parts of Scotland.
    • fifth graph (compared with Great Britain): Scotland has more people in receipt of out-of-work benefits than the Great Britain on average but less than in some of the other regions.
  • Long-term working-age recipients of out-of-work benefits:
    • first graph (over time): most working-age people receiving a key out-of-work benefit for two years or more are sick or disabled.
    • second graph (by reason): almost half of all long-term claimants of out-of-work disability benefits have mental or behaviour disorders.
    • third graph (by age): two-thirds of the long-term claimants of out-of-work disability benefits are aged less than 55 and a third are aged less than 45.
  • Low birthweight babies:
    • first graph (over time): the proportion of babies born with a low birthweight is similar to a decade ago.
    • second graph (by population group): babies born to parents in high-deprivation areas are much more likely to be of low birthweight than those in low-deprivation areas.
    • third graph (by health board): the proportion of babies who are of low birthweight is similar across most of Scotland.
  • School exclusions:
    • first graph (over time): the number of children permanent excluded each year has fallen sharply in recent years and is now less than 100.
  • Destination of school leavers:
    • first graph (over time): the proportion of school leavers who are in not in education or training has fallen considerably since 2006/07.
  • Concentrations of worklessness:
    • first graph (over time): over the last decade, claimant numbers in the areas with the most claimants have fallen at a slightly slower rate than those in the areas with the least claimants.
    • second graph (rates): 35% of working-age people receive out-of-work benefits in the areas with the highest concentrations. This compares with 14% in areas with average concentrations.
    • third graph (shares): around 40% of working-age recipients of out-of-work benefits live in a fifth of small areas, whilst the other 60% live outside of these areas.
  • Location of low pay:
    • first graph and map (by local authority): the proportion of employees earning less than £7 per hour is highest in Dumfries & Galloway, Moray, Clackmannanshire and Highland.
    • second graph (compared with the United Kingdom): Scotland has a somewhat lower proportion of employees earning less than £7 per hour than most other parts of the United Kingdom.
  • Pay inequalities:
    • first graph (over time): low-paid women are paid around 6% less than low-paid men. High-paid women are paid around 20% less than high-paid men.
    • second graph (by gender and type): a half of all part-time workers – both men and women – are paid less than £8 per hour.
  • Excess winter deaths:
    • first graph (over time): each year around 2,000 more people aged 65 and over die in winter months than in other months.
  • Homelessness:
    • first graph (over time): the number of households who are newly homeless has remained unchanged over the last six years.
    • second graph (by household type): three-fifths of those officially recognised as homeless are single adults with no dependent children. Most of the others are lone parents, with relatively few being couples.
    • third graph and map (by local authority): every local authority has a homelessness problem, but Falkirk, West Dunbartonshire, and Glasgow have the greatest problems.
  • Burglaries:
    • first graph (over time): the number of burglaries recorded by the police is now a third of what it was in the mid 1990s.
    • second graph (by local authority): in terms of recorded crime, Aberdeen, Edinburgh and Dundee have the most burglaries.