Updated Scotland indicators

  • Numbers in low income:
    • first graph (over time): the proportion of people in low-income households fell during the early 2000s but has remained unchanged since then.
    • second graph (fixed low-income threshold): the proportion of people in households below a fixed 1994/95 low-income threshold halved in the late 1990s but has remained largely unchanged since 2001/02.
    • third graph (compared to Great Britain – over time): since 2004/05, the proportion of people who are in low-income households has remained unchanged in Scotland but has increased for Great Britain as a whole.
    • fourth graph (compared to Great Britain – by region): the proportion of people in low-income households in Scotland is now much lower than the Great Britain average.
  • Low income by age group:
    • first graph (risks): the proportions of pensioners and children living in low-income households are both lower than a decade ago. By contrast, the proportion for working-age adults without dependent children is similar to a decade ago.
    • second graph (shares): two-fifths of all people in low income are working-age adults without dependent children.
  • Low income by family type:
    • first graph (by family type): almost half of all people in lone parent families are in low income. This is three times the rate for couples with children.
    • second graph (depth of low income): half of all the people with very low incomes are working-age adults without children. Relatively few are either pensioners or in lone parent families.
  • Income inequalities: 
    • first graph (changes in real income – percentages): unlike the rest of the population, the poorest tenth have not seen a substantial rise in their average incomes over the last decade.
    • second graph (changes in real income – shares): three-quarters of the total increase in incomes over the last decade has gone to those with above-average incomes and two-fifths has gone to those in the richest tenth.
    • third graph (total income – over time): apart from the richest tenth, the overall distribution of income has changed little over the last decade. The poorest tenth have 2% of total income.
    • fourth graph (total income – shares): the income of the richest tenth is the same as the income of all those on below-average incomes (i.e. the bottom five tenths) combined.
    • fifth graph (compared to Great Britain): income inequality in Scotland is less than in Great Britain as a whole.
    • sixth graph (composition by income level): compared to the bottom two income deciles, the third decile has more pensioners and more working families.
  • Children in low-income households:
    • first graph (over time): despite a reduction over the last decade, children continue to be much more likely to live in low-income households than adults.
    • second graph (by family type): almost half of all people in lone parent families are in low income. This is three times the rate for couples with children.
    • third graph (by work status): unless all adults in the family are working (and at least one of them full time), the risks of a child being in low income are substantial.
    • fourth graph (shares): half of the children in low-income households live in families where at least one of the adults is in paid work.
    • fifth graph (compared to Great Britain): the proportion of children in low-income households in Scotland is now lower than in any of the other regions of Great Britain. This is because the falls over the last decade have been greater in Scotland than in any of the other regions.
  • Working-age adults in low income:
    • first graph (over time): the proportion of working-age adults who are in low-income households is similar to a decade ago.
    • second graph (compared to the United Kingdom): the proportion of working-age adults who are in low-income households in Scotland is lower than the UK average.
  • Low income by work status:
    • first graph (over time): the only families with a low risk of low income are those where all the adults are working.
    • second graph (shares): among working-age adults in low income, almost half now have someone in their family who is in paid work.
    • third graph (by family type): for working-age adults in low income in both working and workless families, the proportion who do not have dependent children has increased.
  • Older people in low income:
    • first graph (over time): with substantial falls over the last decade, pensioners are now much less likely to be living in low income than non-pensioners.
    • second graph (by family type): the one in six pensioners who are in low income compares to almost half of all people in lone parent families.
    • third graph (by depth): unlike working-age adults, relatively few low-income pensioners have a very low income.
    • fourth graph (compared to the United Kingdom): the proportion of pensioners in low income in Scotland is lower than in any of the other regions of the UK.