Updated Scotland indicators

  • Infant deaths:
    • second graph (by local authority): the authorities with the highest rate of infant deaths are Shetlands and Inverclyde.
  • Impact of qualifications on work:
    • first graph (lack of work): the lower a person’s qualifications, the more likely they are to be lacking but wanting paid work.
    • second graph (low pay): the lower a person’s qualifications, the more likely they are to be low paid.
  • Not in education, employment or training:
    • first graph (over time): around one in seven 16- to 18-year-olds are not in education, employment or training.
    • second graph (compared with the UK): the proportion of 16- to 18-year-olds who are not in education, employment or training in Scotland is somewhat higher than that in most of the rest of the UK.
  • Young adult unemployment:
    • first and second graphs (over time): at 20%, the unemployment rate for 16- to 24-year-olds is now higher than the previous peak in the early 1990s. It is three times the rate for older workers.
    • third graph (compared with the United Kingdom): the unemployment rate for 16- to 24-year-olds in Scotland is somewhat below the UK average.
  • Wanting paid work:
    • first graph (over time): unemployment rose sharply in 2009 and 2010, but the number of people classified as economically inactive but wanting paid work remained broadly unchanged.
    • second graph (by age and sex): for women of all ages, and for older men, those who are economically inactive but wanting paid work substantially outnumber the officially unemployed.
    • third graph (by reason): more than half of those who lack, but want, paid work are not officially unemployed.
    • fifth graph (compared with the United Kingdom): the proportion of the working-age population who lack, but want, paid work in Scotland is similar to the UK average.
  • Work and disability:
    • first graph (over time): 35% of those with a work-limiting disability are working. A further 25% lack, but want, paid work.
    • second graph (compared with the United Kingdom): the proportion of people who are both work-limiting disabled and lack, but want, paid work is somewhat higher in Scotland than in most of the rest of the UK.
  • Blue collar jobs:
    • fourth graph (by gender): four in ten full-time male workers are in production industries, compared to around one in ten full-time female workers and part-time workers.
    • fifth graph (by industry): manufacturing, construction and other production industries are the areas which are dominated by full-time male workers.
  • Low pay by industry:
    • first graph (risks): more than half of employees in the hotel, restaurant, retail and wholesale sectors are paid less than £7 per hour, around two-thirds of them being women.
    • second graph (shares): almost half of all low-paid employees work in the hotel, restaurant, retail and wholesale sectors. A further fifth work in the public sector.
  • Insecure at work:
    • third graph (temporary/part-time): most part-time employees do not want a full-time job – but only a fifth of temporary employees do not want a permanent job.
    • fourth graph (temporary contracts): although rising in recent years, the number of people in temporary contracts is still somewhat lower than a decade ago.
    • fifth graph (union membership): only one in six workers earning less than £7 an hour belong to a trade union, a much smaller proportion than for those with higher hourly earnings.
  • Access to training:
    • first graph (over time): throughout the last decade, people with no qualifications have been around three times less likely to receive job-related training than those with some qualifications.
    • second graph (by level of qualification): the lower a person’s level of educational qualifications, the less likely they are to receive job-related training.
    • third graph (by occupation): access to training differs significantly by occupation, being least in elementary (routine) occupations and for plant & machine operatives.
    • fourth graph (by industry): the best access to training is in the public sector.