Updated Scotland indicators

  • In receipt of tax credits:
    • first graph (over time): the introduction of Working and Child Tax Credits means that the number of working households who are in receipt of tax credits has trebled over the last decade.
    • second graph and map (by local authority): the proportion of the population in receipt of tax credits is lower in Aberdeen and Edinburgh than elsewhere.
    • third graph (compared to the UK): Scotland has a somewhat lower proportion of households who are in receipt of tax credits than most other regions in the UK.
  • Educational attainment at age 16:
    • first graph (over time): whilst standard grade achievement for pupils on average has risen somewhat, that for the bottom fifth is similar to a decade ago.
    • second graph (by level of deprivation): average Standard Grade attainment for pupils in deprived schools is less than that for pupils on average, but not by much.
    • third graph (school leavers): the proportion of school leavers with Standard Grades only is similar to a decade ago but there has been a big rise in the proportion of these who have high Standard Grades.
  • Young adult unemployment:
    • first and second graphs (over time): at 17%, the unemployment rate for 16- to 24-year-olds is now back to the level of the mid 1990s. It is three times the rate for older workers.
    • third graph (compared to the UK): the unemployment rate for 16- to 24-year-olds in Scotland is somewhat below the UK average.
  • Wanting paid work:
    • first graph (over time): unemployment rose sharply in 2009, but the number of people classified as economically inactive but wanting paid work remained unchanged.
    • second graph (by age and sex): for women of all ages, and for older men, those who are economically inactive but wanting paid work substantially outnumber the officially unemployed.
    • third graph (by reason): more than half of those who lack, but want, paid work are not officially unemployed.
    • fifth graph (compared to the UK): the proportion of the working-age population who lack, but want, paid work in Scotland is similar to the UK average.
  • Work and disability:
    • first graph (over time): 35% of those with a work-limiting disability are working. A further 25% lack, but want, paid work.
    • second graph (compared to the UK): the proportion of people who are both work-limiting disabled and lack, but want, paid work is somewhat higher in Scotland than in most of the rest of the UK.
    • third graph (shares): among those who are aged 25 to retirement and not working, half are disabled.
  • Insecure at work:
    • first and second graphs (job insecurity over time): half of the men, and a third of the women, making a new claim for Jobseeker’s Allowance were last claiming less than six months previously.