Updated Northern Ireland indicators

  • Impact of qualifications on work:
    • first graph (lack of work): the lower a person’s qualifications, the more likely they are to be lacking but wanting paid work.
    • second graph (low pay): the lower a person’s qualifications, the more likely they are to be low paid.
  • Not in education, employment or training:
    • first graph (over time): around one in twelve 16- to 18-year-olds are now not in education, employment or training, seemingly much higher than a decade ago.
    • second graph (compared with Great Britain): the proportion of 16- to 18-year-olds who are not in education, employment or training is lower in Northern Ireland than in any of the regions of Great Britain.
  • Young adult unemployment:
    • first and second graphs (over time): at 19% in 2010, the unemployment rate for 16- to 24-year-olds has risen sharply in the last few years. It is more than three times the rate for older workers.
    • third graph (compared with the United Kingdom): the unemployment rate for 16- to 24-year-olds in Northern Ireland is lower than in most of the regions of Great Britain.
  • Wanting paid work:
    • first graph (over time): unemployment rose sharply in 2009 and 2010, but the number of people classified as economically inactive but wanting paid work remained broadly unchanged.
    • second graph (compared to Great Britain): Northern Ireland has a lower proportion of its working-age population who lack, but want, paid work than any of the regions in Great Britain.
    • third graph (total lacking work): Northern Ireland has more of its working-age population not in paid work than any region in Great Britain.
  • Work and disability:
    • first graph (over time): 30% of those with a work-limiting disability are working. A further 15% would like to work but 55% do not want paid work.
    • second graph (compared to Great Britain): the proportion of people who are both work-limiting disabled and lack, but want, paid work is lower in Northern Ireland than in any of the regions of Great Britain.
  • Work and religion:
    • first graph (over time): throughout the last decade, employment rates have been somewhat lower for Catholics than for Protestants.
    • second graph (unemployment): for all age groups, unemployment rates for Catholics are higher than for Protestants.
    • third graph (economic inactivity): for all age groups, economic inactivity rates for Catholics are higher than for Protestants.
  • Blue collar jobs:
    • sixth graph (by gender and occupation): women predominate in personal service, administrative and secretarial jobs whilst men predominate in skilled trades and as process, plant & machine operatives.
  • Low pay by industry:
    • first graph (risks): more than half of employees in the hotel, restaurant, retail and wholesale sectors are paid less than £7 per hour, the majority of them being women.
    • second graph (shares): two-fifths of all low-paid employees work in the hotel, restaurant, retail and wholesale sectors. A further fifth work in the public sector.
  • Insecure at work:
    • first graph (temporary/part-time): most part-time employees do not want a full-time job – but only a quarter of temporary employees do not want a permanent job.
    • second graph (temporary contracts): the number of people in temporary contracts has remained broadly unchanged throughout the last decade.
    • third graph (union membership): less than one in ten workers earning less than £7 an hour belong to a trade union, a much smaller proportion than for those on higher earnings.
  • Access to training:
    • first graph (by level of qualification): people with no qualifications are much less likely to receive any job-related training.
    • second graph (by occupation): access to training differs significantly by occupation, being least in elementary (routine) occupations, plant & machine operatives and skilled trades.
    • third graph (by industry): the best access to training is in financial services and the public sector.
  • Working-age adults without qualifications:
    • first graph (over time): the proportion of the working age population without any educational qualifications has fallen by a quarter over the last decade.
    • second graph (by age and gender): the proportion of people under who lack basic qualifications rises sharply with age.
    • third graph (compared to Great Britain): the proportion of the working-age population without any educational qualifications is much higher in Northern Ireland than in any of the regions in Great Britain.
  • Polarisation by housing tenure:
    • first graph (over time): The proportion of social sector households where the head of the household is not in paid work is similar to a decade ago.
    • fourth graph (compared to Great Britain): three-quarters of heads of households in social housing in Northern Ireland are not in work, more than in any region of Great Britain.
  • Overcrowding:
    • first graph (over time): 4% of people live in overcrowded conditions, down from 8% a decade ago.
    • second graph (by tenure): overcrowding is twice as prevalent in social rented housing as in owner-occupation.
  • Victims of crime:
    • second graph (worries about crime): worries about crime differ substantially by both household income and gender.