Updated Northern Ireland indicators

  • In receipt of tax credits:
    • first graph (over time): the introduction of Working and Child Tax Credits means that the number of working households who are in receipt of tax credits is double that of a decade ago.
    • second graph and map (by local authority): the proportion of working-age households receiving tax credits is higher in most of the western districts than in most of the eastern ones.
    • third graph (compared to Great Britain): Northern Ireland has a higher proportion of households who are in receipt of tax credits than any of the Great Britain regions.
  • Educational attainment at age 16:
    • first graph (over time): in 2008/09, 9% of school leavers obtained fewer than 5 GCSEs. This compares with 15% a decade ago.
    • second graph (by free school meal eligibility): among pupils entitled to free schools meals, the proportion of school leavers who have fewer than five GCSEs has fallen sharply in recent years. It is, however, still more than twice that for school leavers on average.
  • Not in education, employment or training:
    • third graph (by gender): far more girls than boys go into Higher and Further Education, whereas more boys go into training.
  • Young adult unemployment:
    • first and second graphs (over time): After a sharp rise in 2009, the unemployment rate among 16- to 24-year-olds is back to the level of the mid-1990s. It is more than three times the rate for older workers.
    • third graph (compared to Great Britain): the unemployment rate for 16- to 24-year-olds in Northern Ireland is lower than in any of the regions of Great Britain bar one.
  • Wanting paid work:
    • first graph (lacking but wanting work – over time): the number of people who lack, but want, paid work rose sharply in 2009 but is still lower than a decade ago.
    • second graph (lacking but wanting work – compared to Great Britain): Northern Ireland has a lower proportion of its working-age population who lack, but want, paid work than any of the regions in Great Britain.
    • third graph (lacking work – over time): Northern Ireland has more of its working-age population not in paid work than any region in Great Britain.
    • fourth graph (lacking work – compared to Great Britain): Northern Ireland’s high number of people not in paid work is entirely accounted for by the high number of students and long-term sick/disabled.
  • Work and disability:
    • first graph (over time): 30% of those with a work-limiting disability are working. A further 15% would like to work but 55% do not want paid work.
    • second graph (compared to Great Britain): the proportion of people who are both work-limiting disabled and lack, but want, paid work is lower in Northern Ireland than in any region of Great Britain bar one.
    • third graph (shares): among those who are aged 25 to retirement and not working, around half are disabled.
  • Childcare provision:
    • second graph (support from tax credits): the average amount of childcare support from tax credits is higher in Northern Ireland than in most of the regions of Great Britain.