Scotland

Excess winter deaths

Key points

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Graph 1: Over time

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Graph 2: Fuel poverty

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Graph 3: Inefficient housing

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Graph 4: Reasons why cold

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Definitions and data sources

The first graph shows excess winter deaths each year in the 65 and above age group.

'Excess winter deaths' is defined as the difference between the number of deaths which occurred in winter (December to March) and the average number of deaths during the preceding four months (August to November) and the subsequent four months (April to July).  The data source is the General Registrar Office.

The second graph shows the proportion of retired people who are classified as living in fuel poverty, with the data separated out by housing tenure and by level of household income.  The definition of fuel poverty is that adopted by the Scottish Government in 2002.

The third graph shows the proportion of retired people who live in homes with a 'Standard Assessment Procedure' (SAP) rating of less than 30, with the data separated out by housing tenure and by level of household income.  SAP ratings are a measure of energy efficiency (the higher the SAP rating, the better) ranging from 1 to 100.

The fourth graph shows the proportion of retired people who say that their homes are not always warm, with the data separated out by housing tenure and reason.  The reasons have been grouped into two categories, those which include costs and those which do not.

The data source for the second, third and fourth graphs is the 2002 Scottish House Condition Survey (the dataset for which is no longer publicly available), no more recent data being available.

Overall adequacy of the indicator: medium.  Whilst the data sources used here are reliable ones, there is no data providing evidence of a direct causal relationship between winter deaths and energy inefficient housing.

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