WALES

Overcrowding

Graphs on this page:

Supporting information:

Key points

  • Overcrowding is four times as prevalent in rented housing as in owner-occupation.
  • The greatest overcrowding problems are in Cardiff and Ceredigion.
  • Wales has a lower proportion of overcrowded households than elsewhere in the United Kingdom.

Definitions and data sources

The first graph shows how the proportion of households living in overcrowded conditions varies by housing tenure.

The second graph shows how the proportion of households living in overcrowded conditions varies by local authority.

The third graph shows how the proportion of households living in overcrowded conditions in Wales compares to the rest of the United Kingdom.

The map shows how the proportion of households living in overcrowded conditions varies at a small area level (the 2001 Census output areas).

The data for all the graphs and map is from the 2001 Census (tables so053 and so159 for England and Wales, S53 for Scotland and S357 for Northern Ireland).  The standard of overcrowding used in the Census is something called ‘occupancy rating’ which assumes that every household; including one person households; requires a minimum of two common rooms (excluding bathrooms).

Overall adequacy of the indicator: medium.  The Census is clearly a large sample but it is not obvious precisely how the definition of overcrowding that it uses relates to that which is generally accepted (known as ‘the bedroom standard’).